Computer System Analytics


Quick Facts: Computer Systems Analysts
2017 Median Pay $88,270 per year 
$42.44 per hour
Typical Entry-Level Education Bachelor's degree
Work Experience in a Related Occupation None
On-the-job Training None
Number of Jobs, 2016 600,500
Job Outlook, 2016-26 9% (As fast as average)
Employment Change, 2016-26 54,400

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Computer System Analytics Career, Salary and Education Information

What computer system analysts Do

Computer systems analysts, sometimes called systems architects, study an organization’s current computer systems and procedures, and design solutions to help the organization operate more efficiently and effectively. They bring business and information technology (IT) together by understanding the needs and limitations of both.

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Computer system analytics

Duties of computer system analysts

Computer systems analysts typically do the following:

  • Consult with managers to determine the role of IT systems in an organization

  • Research emerging technologies to decide if installing them can increase the organization’s efficiency and effectiveness

  • Prepare an analysis of costs and benefits so that management can decide if IT systems and computing infrastructure upgrades are financially worthwhile

  • Devise ways to add new functionality to existing computer systems

  • Design and implement new systems by choosing and configuring hardware and software

  • Oversee the installation and configuration of new systems to customize them for the organization

  • Conduct testing to ensure that the systems work as expected

  • Train the systems’ end users and write instruction manuals

Most computer systems analysts specialize in computer systems that are specific to the organization they work with. For example, an analyst might work predominantly with financial computer systems or with engineering computer systems. Computer systems analysts help other IT team members understand how computer systems can best serve an organization by working closely with the organization’s business leaders.

Computer systems analysts use a variety of techniques, such as data modeling, to design computer systems. Data modeling allows analysts to view processes and data flows. Analysts conduct indepth tests and analyze information and trends in the data to increase a system’s performance and efficiency.

Analysts calculate requirements for how much memory, storage, and computing power the computer system needs. They prepare flowcharts or other kinds of diagrams for programmers or engineers to use when building the system. Analysts also work with these people to solve problems that arise after the initial system is set up. Most analysts do some programming in the course of their work.

In some cases, analysts who supervise the initial installation or upgrade of IT systems from start to finish may be called IT project managers. They monitor a project’s progress to ensure that deadlines, standards, and cost targets are met. IT project managers who also plan and direct an organization’s IT department or IT policies are included in the profile on computer and information systems managers.

Many computer systems analysts are general-purpose analysts who develop new systems or fine-tune existing ones; however, there are some specialized systems analysts. The following are examples of types of computer systems analysts:

Software quality assurance (QA) analysts do indepth testing and diagnose problems of the systems they design. Testing and diagnosis are done in order to make sure that critical requirements are met. QA analysts also write reports to management recommending ways to improve the systems.

Programmer analysts design and update their system’s software and create applications tailored to their organization’s needs. They do more coding and debugging than other types of analysts, although they still work extensively with management and business analysts to determine the business needs that the applications are meant to address. Other occupations that do programming are computer programmers and software developers.


Work Environment for Computer system analysts

Computer systems analysts held about 600,500 jobs in 2016. The largest employers of computer systems analysts were as follows:

Computer systems design and related services : 28%

Finance and insurance: 13%

Management of companies and enterprises: 9%

Information: 8%

Government: 6%

Computer systems analysts can work directly for an organization or as contractors, often working for an information technology firm. The projects that computer systems analysts work on usually require them to collaborate and coordinate with others.

Analysts who work on contracts in the computer systems design and related services industry may move from one project to the next as they complete work for clients.

Work Schedules for computer system analysts

Most systems analysts work full time. About 1 in 5 worked more than 40 hours per week in 2016.


How to Become a Computer system analyst

A bachelor’s degree in a computer or information science field is common, although not always a requirement. Some firms hire analysts with business or liberal arts degrees who have skills in information technology or computer programming.

Education

Most computer systems analysts have a bachelor’s degree in a computer-related field. Because these analysts also are heavily involved in the business side of a company, it may be helpful to take business courses or major in management information systems.

Some employers prefer applicants who have a master’s degree in business administration (MBA) with a concentration in information systems. For more technically complex jobs, a master’s degree in computer science may be more appropriate.

Although many computer systems analysts have technical degrees, such a degree is not always a requirement. Many analysts have liberal arts degrees and have gained programming or technical expertise elsewhere.

Many systems analysts continue to take classes throughout their careers so that they can learn about new and innovative technologies. Technological advances come so rapidly in the computer field that continual study is necessary to remain competitive.

Systems analysts must understand the business field they are working in. For example, a hospital may want an analyst with a thorough understanding of health plans and programs such as Medicare and Medicaid, and an analyst working for a bank may need to understand finance. Having knowledge of their industry helps systems analysts communicate with managers to determine the role of the information technology (IT) systems in an organization.

Advancement

With experience, systems analysts can advance to project manager and lead a team of analysts. Some can eventually become IT directors or chief technology officers. For more information, see the profile on computer and information systems managers.

Important Qualities

Analytical skills. Analysts must interpret complex information from various sources and decide the best way to move forward on a project. They must also figure out how changes may affect the project.

Communication skills. Analysts work as a go-between with management and the IT department and must explain complex issues in a way that both will understand.

Creativity. Because analysts are tasked with finding innovative solutions to computer problems, an ability to “think outside the box” is important.


salaries for Computer system analysts

The median annual wage for computer systems analysts was $88,270 in May 2017. The median wage is the wage at which half the workers in an occupation earned more than that amount and half earned less. The lowest 10 percent earned less than $53,750, and the highest 10 percent earned more than $139,850.

 

In May 2017, the median annual wages for computer systems analysts in the top industries in which they worked were as follows:

Computer systems design and related services: $91,240

Finance and insurance: $90,590

Management of companies and enterprises: $89,930

Information: $89,570

Government: $77,460

Most systems analysts work full time. About 1 in 5 worked more than 40 hours per week in 2016.


Job Outlook for Computer system analysts

Employment of computer systems analysts is projected to grow 9 percent from 2016 to 2026, about as fast as the average for all occupations.

As organizations across the economy increase their reliance on information technology (IT), analysts will be hired to design and install new computer systems. Smaller firms with minimal IT requirements will find it more cost effective to contract with cloud service providers, or to industries that employ expert IT service providers, for these workers. This contracting should lead to job growth in both the data processing, hosting, and related services industry and the computer systems design and related services industry.

Additional job growth is expected in healthcare fields. Computer systems analysts will be needed to accommodate the anticipated increase in the use and implementation of electronic health records, e-prescribing, and other forms of healthcare IT.

Job Prospects

An understanding of the specific field an analyst is working in is helpful in getting a position. For example, a hospital may desire an analyst with a background or coursework in health management. Overall, candidates with a background in business may have better prospects because jobs for computer systems analysts often require knowledge of an organization’s business needs.

Employment projections data for Computer Systems Analysts, 2016-26

Employment, 2016: 600,500

Projected Employment, 2026: 654,900

Change, 2016-2026: +9%, +54,400


Careers Related to computer systems analysts

Actuaries

Actuaries analyze the financial costs of risk and uncertainty. They use mathematics, statistics, and financial theory to assess the risk of potential events, and they help businesses and clients develop policies that minimize the cost of that risk. Actuaries’ work is essential to the insurance industry.

Computer and Information Research Scientists

Computer and information research scientists invent and design new approaches to computing technology and find innovative uses for existing technology. They study and solve complex problems in computing for business, medicine, science, and other fields.

Computer and Information Systems Managers

Computer and information systems managers, often called information technology (IT) managers or IT project managers, plan, coordinate, and direct computer-related activities in an organization. They help determine the information technology goals of an organization and are responsible for implementing computer systems to meet those goals.

Computer Network Architects

Computer network architects design and build data communication networks, including local area networks (LANs), wide area networks (WANs), and Intranets. These networks range from small connections between two offices to next-generation networking capabilities such as a cloud infrastructure that serves multiple customers.

Computer Programmers

Computer programmers write and test code that allows computer applications and software programs to function properly. They turn the program designs created by software developers and engineers into instructions that a computer can follow.

Computer Support Specialists

Computer support specialists provide help and advice to computer users and organizations. These specialists either support computer networks or they provide technical assistance directly to computer users.

Database Administrators

Database administrators (DBAs) use specialized software to store and organize data, such as financial information and customer shipping records. They make sure that data are available to users and secure from unauthorized access.

Information Security Analysts

Information security analysts plan and carry out security measures to protect an organization's computer networks and systems. Their responsibilities are continually expanding as the number of cyberattacks increases.

Network and Computer Systems Administrators

Computer networks are critical parts of almost every organization. Network and computer systems administrators are responsible for the day-to-day operation of these networks.

Operations Research Analysts

Operations research analysts use advanced mathematical and analytical methods to help organizations investigate complex issues, identify and solve problems, and make better decisions.

Software Developers

Software developers are the creative minds behind computer programs. Some develop the applications that allow people to do specific tasks on a computer or another device. Others develop the underlying systems that run the devices or that control networks.

Web Developers

Web developers design and create websites. They are responsible for the look of the site. They are also responsible for the site's technical aspects, such as its performance and capacity, which are measures of a website's speed and how much traffic the site can handle. In addition, web developers may create content for the site.

OccupationENTRY-LEVEL EDUCATION2017 MEDIAN PAY
ActuariesBachelor's degree$101,560
Computer and Information Research ScientistsMaster's degree$114,520
Computer and Information Systems ManagersBachelor's degree$139,220
Computer Network ArchitectsBachelor's degree$104,650
Computer ProgrammersBachelor's degree$82,240
Database AdministratorsBachelor's degree$87,020
Information Security AnalystsBachelor's degree$95,510
Management AnalystsBachelor's degree$82,450
Network and Computer Systems AdministratorsBachelor's degree$81,100
Operations Research AnalystsBachelor's degree$81,390
Software DevelopersBachelor's degree$103,560
Computer Support Specialists$52,810
Web DevelopersAssociate's degree$67,990

Citation:

Bureau of Labor Statistics, U.S. Department of Labor, Occupational Outlook Handbook, Computer Systems Analysts,
on the Internet at https://www.bls.gov/ooh/computer-and-information-technology/computer-systems-analysts.htm