Social and Community Service Managers


Quick Facts: Social and Community Service Managers
2017 Median Pay $64,100 per year 
$30.82 per hour
Typical Entry-Level Education Bachelor's degree
Work Experience in a Related Occupation Less than 5 years
On-the-job Training None
Number of Jobs, 2016 147,300
Job Outlook, 2016-26 18% (Much faster than average)
Employment Change, 2016-26 26,500

Join Nextstep Career Mentorship Programs with our Social and Community Service Management partners:


Social and Community Service Management Career, Salary, and Education Information

What Social and Community Service Managers Do

Social and community service managers meet with community members and funding providers to discuss their programs.

Social and community service managers coordinate and supervise social service programs and community organizations. They manage workers who provide social services to the public.

 

social comunity service mgmt.jpg

Social and Community Service Managers

Duties of social and community service managers

Social and community service managers typically do the following:

  • Work with community members and other stakeholders to identify necessary programs and services

  • Oversee administrative aspects of programs to meet the objectives of the stakeholders

  • Analyze data to determine the effectiveness of programs

  • Suggest and implement improvements to programs and services

  • Plan and manage outreach activities to advocate for increased awareness of programs

  • Write proposals for social services funding

Social and community service managers work for a variety of social and human service organizations. Some of these organizations focus on working with a particular demographic, such as children, people who are homeless, older adults, or veterans. Others focus on helping people with particular challenges, such as substance abuse, mental health needs, chronic hunger, and long-term unemployment.

Social and community service managers are often expected to show that their programs and services are effective. They collect statistics and other information to evaluate the impact their programs have on the community or their target audience. They are usually required to report this information to administrators or funders. They may also use evaluations to identify opportunities to improve their programs, such as providing mentorship and assessments for their staff.

Although the specific job duties of social and community service managers may vary with the size of the organization, most managers must recruit, hire, and train new staff members. They also supervise staff, such as social workers, who provide services directly to clients. Additionally, they may perform some of the services of the workers they oversee.

In large agencies, social and community service managers tend to have specialized duties. They may be responsible for running only one program in an organization and reporting to the agency’s upper management. They usually do not design programs but instead supervise and implement programs set up by administrators, elected officials, or other stakeholders.

In small organizations, social and community managers often have many roles. They represent their organization through public speaking engagements or in communitywide committees; they oversee programs and execute their implementations; they spend time on administrative tasks, such as managing budgets; and they also help with raising funds and meeting with potential donors.


Work Environment for Social and Community Service Managers

Social and community service managers held about 147,300 jobs in 2016. The largest employers of social and community service managers were as follows:

Individual and family services: 27%

Religious, grantmaking, civic, professional, and similar organizations: 12%

Local government, excluding education and hospitals: 11%

Nursing and residential care facilities: 11%

Community and vocational rehabilitation services: 10%

Social and community service managers work for nonprofit organizations, private for-profit social service companies, and government agencies. They also work in a variety of settings, including offices, clinics, hospitals, and shelters.

Work Schedules

The majority of social and community service managers work full time. They may work extended hours to meet deadlines or when preparing new programs; about 1 in 4 worked more than 40 hours per week in 2016.


How to Become a Social and Community Service Manager

Social and community service managers typically need at least a bachelor's degree and work experience in a related occupation.

Social and community service managers typically need at least a bachelor’s degree and work experience. However, some positions also require a master’s degree.

Education

Most social and community service manager jobs require a bachelor’s degree in social work, public or business administration, public health, or a related field. However, some positions also require a master’s degree.

Work Experience

Workers usually need experience in order to become a social and community service manager, and it is essential for those with a bachelor’s degree. Lower-level management positions may require only a few years of experience, although social and community service directors typically have much more experience. Candidates can get this experience by working as a social workersubstance abuse counselor, or in a similar occupation.

Important Qualities

Analytical skills. Social and community service managers need to understand and evaluate data in order to provide strategic guidance to their organization. They must be able to monitor and evaluate current programs as well as determine new initiatives.

Communication skills. Social and community service managers must be able to speak and write clearly so that others can understand them. Public speaking experience is also helpful because social and community service managers often participate in community outreach.

Managerial skills. Social and community service managers spend much of their time administering budgets and responding to a wide variety of issues.

Problem-solving skills. Social and community service managers must be able to address client, staff, and agency-related issues as they occur.

Time-management skills. Social and community service managers must prioritize and handle numerous tasks for multiple customers, often in a short timeframe.


Social and Community Service Manager Salaries

The median annual wage for social and community service managers was $64,100 in May 2017. The median wage is the wage at which half the workers in an occupation earned more than that amount and half earned less. The lowest 10 percent earned less than $39,730, and the highest 10 percent earned more than $109,990.

 

In May 2017, the median annual wages for social and community service managers in the top industries in which they worked were as follows:

Local government, excluding education and hospitals: $82,100

Religious, grantmaking, civic, professional, and similar organizations: $67,580

Nursing and residential care facilities: $60,970

Community and vocational rehabilitation services: $59,450

Individual and family services: $57,990

The majority of social and community service managers work full time. They may work extended hours to meet deadlines or when preparing new programs; about 1 in 4 worked more than 40 hours per week in 2016.


Job Outlook for Social and Community Service Managers

Employment of social and community service managers is projected to grow 18 percent from 2016 to 2026, much faster than the average for all occupations.

Much of the job growth in this occupation is the result of an aging population. An increase in the number of older adults will result in a need for more social services, such as adult daycare and meal delivery, creating demand for social and community service managers. Employment of social and community service managers is expected to increase the most in industries serving the elderly, such as services for the elderly and persons with disabilities.

In addition, employment growth is projected as people continue to seek treatment for their addictions, and as illegal drug offenders are increasingly sent to treatment programs rather than to jail. As a result, managers who direct treatment programs will be needed.

Job Prospects

Job prospects are expected to be good because of the continued expected demand for individual and family social services.

Employment projections data for social and community service managers, 2016-26:

Employment, 2016: 147,300

Projected Employment, 2026: 173,80

Change, 2016-2026: +18%, +26,500


Careers Related to Social and Community Service Managers

Health Educators and Community Health Workers

Health educators teach people about behaviors that promote wellness. They develop and implement strategies to improve the health of individuals and communities. Community health workers collect data and discuss health concerns with members of specific populations or communities.

Marriage and Family Therapists

Marriage and family therapists help people manage and overcome problems with family and other relationships.

Medical and Health Services Managers

Medical and health services managers, also called healthcare executivesor healthcare administrators, plan, direct, and coordinate medical and health services. They might manage an entire facility, a specific clinical area or department, or a medical practice for a group of physicians. Medical and health services managers must direct changes that conform to changes in healthcare laws, regulations, and technology.

Probation Officers and Correctional Treatment Specialists

Probation officers and correctional treatment specialists provide social services to assist in rehabilitation of law offenders in custody or on probation or parole.

Rehabilitation Counselors

Rehabilitation counselors help people with physical, mental, developmental, or emotional disabilities live independently. They work with clients to overcome or manage the personal, social, or psychological effects of disabilities on employment or independent living.

School and Career Counselors

School counselors help students develop the academic and social skills needed to succeed in school. Career counselors help people choose careers and follow a path to employment.

Social and Human Service Assistants

Social and human service assistants provide client services, including support for families, in a wide variety of fields, such as psychology, rehabilitation, and social work. They assist other workers, such as social workers, and they help clients find benefits or community services.

Social Workers

Social workers help people solve and cope with problems in their everyday lives. Clinical social workers also diagnose and treat mental, behavioral, and emotional issues.

Substance Abuse, Behavioral Disorder, and Mental Health Counselors

Substance abuse, behavioral disorder, and mental health counselors advise people who suffer from alcoholism, drug addiction, eating disorders, mental health issues, or other mental or behavioral problems. They provide treatment and support to help clients recover from addiction or modify problem behaviors.


Citation:

Bureau of Labor Statistics, U.S. Department of Labor, Occupational Outlook Handbook, Social and Community Service Managers, on the Internet at https://www.bls.gov/ooh/management/social-and-community-service-managers.htm